Research history

Welcome at the Archaeological site of Plakari, Karystos, Greece

Research history

The importance and potential of the site of Plakari was already noted by D. Theocharis in the 1950s (Theocharis 1959, 279, 284, 310). During archaeological surveys by T.W. Jacobsen (1964) and H. Sackett and his team (1966) a number of find spots in the Karystos area were identified, including the site of Plakari, which is described under the entry for ‘Karystos’ but not named by Sackett and his colleagues (1966, 81). Between 1979 and 1981, Donald Keller carried out a one-man archaeological survey (Keller 1985). He recorded 18 concentrations of artifacts visible in road scarps and on the surface of Plakari. Eleven of these find spots contained Early Iron Age and Archaic material, the remaining seven probable Final Neolithic (FN) or Early Bronze Age (EBA) finds. In response to road construction on Plakari in 1979, the 11th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities authorized test trenches and a small salvage excavation directed by Keller on the south side of the ridge where bulldozing had exposed a wall, ceramics and other finds belonging to the FN and EIA (Cullen, Talalay, Keller, Karimal & Farrand 2013). In the 1980s and 1990s, systematic investigations of the Karystos region were carried out by the Southern Euboea Exploration Project (SEEP), a multidisciplinary research project conducted under the auspices of the Canadian Archaeological Institute in Athens (Keller & Hom 2010; Cullen, Tankosić & Chidiroglou 2010; Talalay & Tankosić 2011. As part of this project, revisits of Plakari were made and more find locations were documented. Between 1997 and 2009, a series of salvage excavations were carried out by Maria Chidiroglou (Chidiroglou 2005) and Maria Kosma for the 11th Ephorate. These excavations, which preceded the construction of summer houses and roads on Plakari’s south slope, yielded wall remains, pottery and small finds of the FN and Geometric periods. Some of the EIA material appeared to come form cultic contexts.